Live Streaming

Click here to listen to 98.9fm live!

Other options:

 
 

Let's Talk

Professor David Lambert

 Let's Talk

09 June 2016

David Lambert is a Professor at Griffith University’s School of Environment, and an expert on ancient DNA. He joined Amy McQuire to discuss in more detail a groundbreaking new study which has found Aboriginal people were the first people on this continent.

A study in 2001, arising from analysis of DNA in the samples of ancient Aboriginal people – including the 42,000 year old Mungo Man – suggested that there were people here before our ancestors. That research – 15 years ago – found that the DNA that had been attributed to Mungo Man, were not similar to other ancient skeletons, or modern Aboriginal people. Now this raised the possibility at the time, that a separate group of humans originated from South Asia, rather than the out-of-Africa theory which is currently the most accepted theory on human migration. There was a great deal of controversy. But that finding has been overturned in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scientists – which has used second generation DNA sequencing to re-examine the remains.

Prof Lambert and his colleagues were able to assemble two complete mitochondrial genomes from the sample taken around Mungo Man. One of those genomes, is related to modern Aboriginal people – it is the first complete mitochondrial genome of an ancient Aboriginal person. But what does this mean for the out-of-Africa theory? And what is DNA, what does it mean, and what is the scientific process involved in unlocking the secrets of our ancient history?

Check out the interview with Prof Lambert for more.

Play

Allan Clarke

 Let's Talk

30 May 2016

Allan Clarke is a Muruwari man from Bourke, NSW and a prominent First Nations journalist, currently writing for Buzzfeed Australia. He has been covering a lot of cases that revolve around the issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal men, women and children. He joined Amy McQuire on the programme to discuss one story in particular, the tragic case of Mark Haines. Mark was only 17 when he was found murdered on the train tracks in Tamworth. That was in 1988. 28 years on, there has never been any justice for Mark.

If you would like to read more about the story, see Allan’s reporting here.

Play

Ellen van Neerven

 Let's Talk

27 May 2016

Ellen van Neerven is an award-winning Murri writer who grew up in Brisbane – she is Yugambeh. Her first book – Heat and Light – won the prestigious David Unaipon award for Unpublished Indigenous authors in 2013, and it has since won the Indigenous Writers Prize at the NSW Premiers Literary Awards, an honour she shared with Bruce Pascoe. Ellen just released her collection of poetry – Comfort Food.

She talks to Amy McQuire about her own story, how she began writing, who inspired her and where she hopes to go with black literature. She is also a part of the black&write! Indigenous writing and editing project at the State Library of Queensland.

Play

Sharon Williams

 Let's Talk

26 May 2016

May 26th is the 19th anniversary of the Bringing Them Home report into the Stolen Generations. But 19 years on, there is little to celebrate. The rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care has sky-rocketed. In fact, the rates have gone up by 400 percent since 1997, when the Bringing Them Home report was handed down.

Amy McQuire spoke to Secretariat of the National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care (SNAICC) chairperson Sharon Williams about why these rates are so high, and what needs to be done to slow the escalating numbers of First Nations children who are being taken away from their families.

Play

Dr Donna Green

 Let's Talk

25 May 2016

Dr Donna Green is a climate scientist, and researcher at the Climate Change Research Centre at UNSW. She has been researching the impact climate change will have on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for the past decade. She joins Amy McQuire to discuss how climate change will compound every aspect of our lives – from health, housing, infrastructure, and our connections to country. She is optimistic about the next generation of young Indigenous leaders who are coming through to fight our reliance on fossil fuels.

If you want to find out more about how climate change will impact our mob particularly, see the following links:

Sharing Knowledge, Sharing Knowledge Map to find out how climate change will impact your local region, and the work the Kimberley Land Council is doing on country.

Play

Don Carter and Dr Vicki Grieves

 Let's Talk

24 May 2016

Don Carter was born in 1943, the son of an Aboriginal mother and an African American serviceman who was stationed in Townsville during World War II. His parents were married in 1941… but a year later, his father returned to America. Because of the discriminatory laws in both America and Australia, Don and his mother were prevented from seeing his dad again.

Don’s story is one among many, and they are being pieced together by Dr Vicki Grieves, a Worimi researcher at the University of Sydney. Don and Vicki joined Amy McQuire to discuss Children of War.

For more information about the project, see the following link.

Play

Sovereign Women United

 Let's Talk

23 May 2016

The 26th May 2016 marks the 19th anniversary of the Bringing Them Home report. 19 years on, the rates of Aboriginal child removal has sky-rocketed. More and more Aboriginal children are being taken away – in fact the numbers now reach about 15,000 nationally. In Queensland, the majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids – around 62 percent – are known to ‘child protection’. The impact of child protection in all states and territories leave a legacy of trauma that spans the generations.

This morning, Aunty Karen Fusi, Aunty Cephia Williams, Aunty Karen Robert and Debbie Jones joined Amy McQuire to discuss the impact child protection has had on their families, and the steps that First Nations grandmothers across the country are taking to fight back. The Grandmothers Against Removals groups are going strong, and there is a new group – Sovereign Women United – which is aiming to provide support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, not just in relation to child protection, but also with other matters – like family violence, housing, justice, which all feeds into this out-of-home care crisis.

For more information, see the Facebook page, or website.

Play

Bruce Pascoe

 Let's Talk

23 May 2016

Bruce Pascoe is a Bunurong and Yuin man, and author of the acclaimed book Dark Emu – which recently won the NSW Premier’s Literary Prize Book of the Year. Dark Emu has demolished the myths that Aboriginal people were hunters and gatherers by outlining the sophisticated Aboriginal agriculture methods that were used pre-invasion. Mr Pascoe is now hoping to re-vitalise those traditional techniques as a way to promote the strength of Aboriginal cultures. He joined Amy McQuire to talk about what the success of Dark Emu means – is Australia ready to own up to the whitewashing of history?

Play

Louise Taylor

 Let's Talk

19 May 2016

Kamilaroi lawyer Louise Taylor joins Amy McQuire on the programme to discuss the different ways the justice system treats Aboriginal victims, following on from the tragic case of Lynette Daley. You can find out more about Lynette’s story here at the Four Corners website.

Louise also discusses the complexities behind family violence in Aboriginal communities, how these nuances are ill-served by the media, and how mainstream feminism has to learn to interact with the the other factors that further impact Aboriginal women particularly. We also discuss the child protection system, and how the deep rivers of trauma that still run through our communities, has to be healed in order to move forward.

Play

Prof Jon Altman

 Let's Talk

18 May 2016

Prof Jon Altman is a research professor at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University, Melbourne and an emeritus professor at the Australian National University in Canberra. He has also worked in Aboriginal policy over the past three decades and is one of our foremost experts on Indigenous policy.

He joined Amy McQuire to discuss the recent budget and its repercussions for Aboriginal affairs, as well as the history of the Aboriginal Benefits Account, which he says has turned into a ministerial slush fund, when it was originally regarded as a “progressive institution for Aboriginal economic empowerment and development”.

For more information on the ABA, check out Prof Altman’s recent article in New Matilda, which can be found here.

Play

Danny Chapman

 Let's Talk

17 May 2016

Danny Chapman is a Walbunga man from the Yuin nation and the Councillor for the South Coast at the NSW Aboriginal Land Council. He joined Amy McQuire on the programme to talk about Aboriginal cultural fishing rights in his homelands. Aboriginal people are currently being slapped with heavy fines and jail time for exercising their right to cultural fishing, and it is an issue that the NSW government is dragging its feet on resolving. That’s despite passing legislation to recognising Aboriginal cultural fishing in 2009, amendments that have not yet been enacted.

Play

Rod Little

 Let's Talk

12 May 2016

Co-Chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples Rod Little joins Amy McQuire on the programme to talk about the Indigenous affairs minister Nigel Scullion’s recent decision not to fund the body – the only national elected First Nations body in the country.

Mr Little spoke about the need for true representation, the way forward for Congress and the importance of treaty in the continuing constitutional reform debate.

Play

Thom Mitchell

 Let's Talk

08 May 2016

New Matilda’s environmental reporter Thom Mitchell joins Amy McQuire to discuss the recent blockade down at the Newcastle coal export port following on from our focus on climate change. We discuss the amount of carbon emissions Australia is exporting, and why this needs to be the focus in the upcoming election campaign.

For more of Thom’s reporting click here.

Play

Joseph White Eyes and Larissa Baldwin

 Let's Talk

07 May 2016

Amy McQuire is joined in the studio by Joseph White Eyes, a young Lakota man from Turtle Island (America), who has been advocating for climate justice since he was 14. He is joined by Seed campaigner and Bundjalung woman Larissa Baldwin.

To find out more about the Dakota Access Pipeline mentioned in this podcast see, this news report. And to find out more about Seed and their petition to protect country click here.

Play

Amelia Telford

 Let's Talk

04 May 2016

Amelia Telford is a Bundjalung and South Sea Islander woman and the founder of Seed – a climate justice campaign run by and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth. Amelia joins Amy McQuire to discuss the Seed’s recent climate summit down in Sydney.

Specifically, they discuss the over $7 billion in subsidies the federal government has given to fossil fuel industries. Seed is currently running a petition against this. You can find out more here.

The petition reads:

“We are calling on Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull to rule out any Federal Government investment, subsidies or royalty free periods for any new coal and unconventional gas projects.

As Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the First peoples of this land, we have a responsibility and a right to look after country as our people have for generations.

We have lived sustainably off this land since time immemorial. It is an unbroken legacy of the most successful sustainability this world has ever known. It is one unbroken chain and we refuse to be the link that breaks. This is why as young people we know we cannot sit by, we must rise to this challenge and take action.”

Play

Dr Lesley van Schoubroeck

 Let's Talk

03 May 2016

Dr Lesley van Schoubroeck is Queensland’s Mental Health Commissioner and joins Amy McQuire in the studio to discuss the Mental Health Commission’s community consultations to develop an action plan around Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing.

The Queensland Mental Health Commission (QMHC) was established on 1 July 2013 as a statutory body under the Queensland Mental Health Commission Act 2013.

For more information, see the commission’s website here.

Play

Chris Graham

 Let's Talk

29 April 2016

Chris Graham joins Amy McQuire in the studio to discuss this week’s news… including Constitutional reform and treaty as well as New Matilda’s upcoming election coverage.

Play

Kyllie Cripps and Jackie Huggins

 Let's Talk

27 April 2016

Amy McQuire is joined by Dr Kyllie Cripps, Acting Director of the Indigenous Law Centre in the Law Faculty at the University of New South Wales and Dr Jackie Huggins, the co-chair of the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples to discuss the issue of Family Violence in our communities, following on from the Royal Commission into Family Violence down in Victoria.

Play

Bob Fuller

 Let's Talk

26 April 2016

Bob Fuller is currently a PhD student at School of Humanities and Languages, University of NSW, researching a project in Aboriginal astronomy. He joins Amy McQuire to discuss his work looking at ‘star maps’, told to him by the Kamilaroi and Euahlayi peoples in New South Wales.

Play

Paul Daley

 Let's Talk

25 April 2016

The Guardian’s Paul Daley joins Amy McQuire on ANZAC Day to talk about Australia’s myth-making, and the Frontier Wars. We discuss his work uncovering the truth behind the Light Horse Brigade at the Battle of Beersheba and how Australian history hides uncomfortable realities. Paul also tells the amazing story of Private Douglas Grant. For more on that story, check out Paul’s work here.

Play
 

E-mail Newsletter Signup

Subscribe
To Our E-Mail
Newsletter

98.9FM Podcasts

  • Throw Back Thursday- Rodriguez

    > Interviews
    You need Flash Player to view this content
  • Bobby Alu

    > Interviews
    You need Flash Player to view this content
  • Beth Brown

    > Interviews
    You need Flash Player to view this content

AFL Live

 

Photos on Flickr

Polls